Democratic Governance

  • 2011 Mar 07

    The Impact of Good Governance on Wealth and Happiness

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge, MA

    Pakistani National CelebrationInternational Findings from the Legatum Prosperity Index
    Jiehae Choi, Nathan Gamester, & Ashley Thomas Lenihan
    Legatum Institute

    About the Seminar
    The Legatum Prosperity Index is the only global assessment of national prosperity that defines ’prosperity’ as encompassing both wealth and well being. The most prosperous nations are not simply those with the highest GDP, but also those with happy, healthy, and free citizens. The Index identifies good governance – effective/accountable government, participatory and fair elections with a reliable rule of law – as one of eight key pillars of a prosperous society. Yet good governance alone does not produce prosperity. Representatives from the Legatum Institute will explain why and how countries can leverage good governance into prosperity. By introducing attendees to the interactive Index, the Institute hopes to spur attendees to ask more questions about global prosperity, use the Index for research, and with your questions and comments help make this Index even better.... Read more about The Impact of Good Governance on Wealth and Happiness

  • 2011 Mar 02

    Egypt: The Road to and from Liberation Square

    5:00pm to 6:00pm

    Location: 

    Center for Middle Eastern Studies, 38 Kirkland Street, Room 102

    Tarek Masoud, Ash Center

    About the Seminar
    A discussion led by Tarek Masoud, assistant professor of public policy, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School.

    Harvard University’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies Mideast Newsreel series is a new public discussion program in which senior faculty will present an analysis of current events as a key to the understanding of contemporary history in a Middle Eastern country or region.

    Watch a recording of the presentation here.... Read more about Egypt: The Road to and from Liberation Square

  • 2011 Mar 02

    Ending Female Genital Cutting: A Way that Works

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    124 Mount Auburn, Suite 200-North, Room 226, Cambridge, MA

    Gerry MackieGerry Mackie, University of California San Diego

    About the Seminar
    Gerry Mackie will report on the theory and practice of his work with the West African NGO Tostan since 1998, and UNICEF since 2004, in organizing collective abandonment of female genital cutting and other harmful social practices. His approach combines historical sociology, simple game theory, simple network analysis, social norms, moral psychology, and values deliberations. It was recently declared the “common approach” in a document published by major donor-country development agencies and intergovernmental organizations. The organized change of social norms in the community through values deliberations is a good way to solve some development problems.... Read more about Ending Female Genital Cutting: A Way that Works

  • 2011 Feb 10

    Muslim and American? How Religiosity and Mosques Foster Incorporation into American Politics

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge, MA

    Dr. Karam Dana, Harvard Kennedy School
    Dr. Matt Barreto, University of Washington

    About the Seminar
    Previous scholars have argued that Islam as a religion and a culture is incompatible with liberal, democratic American values. Not only is Islam inconsistent with the West, but it poses a direct conflict according to some scholars. This viewpoint has been popularized in American and European media and by government officials who declare fundamentalist Muslims as enemies of freedom and democracy. However, there is no evidence that the grounds of conflict are based on religious ideology. Are the most devout Muslims really opposed to political incorporation in the U.S., or are other traditional non-religious factors such as socioeconomic status and acculturation more important in understanding political alienation? To date, nearly every study of Islam and Western values has been qualitative, anecdotal, or philosophical in nature, leaving most questions unanswered, at least empirically. Using a unique national survey of Muslim Americans, we find that more religiously devout Muslims are significantly more likely to support political participation in America – in contrast to prevailing wisdom. We conclude that there is nothing inconsistent with Islam and American democracy, and in fact, religiosity fosters support for American democratic values.... Read more about Muslim and American? How Religiosity and Mosques Foster Incorporation into American Politics

  • 2011 Feb 09

    The Anti-Immigrant Right & the Future of Political Polling

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    Pop Center, 9 Bow Street, Cambridge, MA

    Matt A. BarretoMatt A. Barreto, University of Washington

    About the Seminar
    In 2010 Republicans received a swell of support that gave them a majority in the U.S. House of Representatives, however they fell short of taking the Senate. Beyond the 60 seat GOP pickup in the House, the big news story of Election 2010 was the Democrats holding on to the Senate, against all odds, and to the bewilderment of most pollsters.

    What explains the Democrats’ success, and the polls failure in multiple U.S. Senate contests? Quite simply: the Latino vote. Research from Latino Decisions shows very clearly that the extreme anti-immigrant stance taken by many Republicans drove down their share among Latino voters to historic lows, and that further, traditional pre-election and exit polls failed to accurately predict or capture this pattern.... Read more about The Anti-Immigrant Right & the Future of Political Polling

  • 2011 Jan 26

    Democracy and Development: Lessons from China, India, and Others

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Room 226, Cambridge, MA

    William OverholtWilliam Overholt, Ash Center

    About the Seminar
    Case studies of democracy and economic development indicate that, in the earliest stages of economic and social development, democratic institutions modeled on the U.S. and western Europe empower an elite at the expense of weaker groups, exacerbate income and educational inequality, and inhibit efficient management of the economy. India and the Philippines have produced horrible social outcomes to date – morally unacceptable poverty, disease, inequality, and violence – although India’s efforts to emulate Chinese development strategies have borne considerable fruit. India could teach the world new lessons about combining development and democracy or it could fail at globalization and be crippled by social unrest.... Read more about Democracy and Development: Lessons from China, India, and Others

  • 2010 Dec 08

    Indigenous Governance, Equity, and Rights in Pluralistic Settings

    Wed Dec 8 (All day) to Sun Dec 12 (All day)

    Location: 

    Cusco, Peru

    Mick Dodson, Indigenous Nations Builders NetworkOn December 8-12, 2010, the Liaison Group for Innovations in Governance and Public Action will hold its annual meeting in Cusco, Peru. The event will include presentations from member groups on new initiatives and programs related to innovations in in public service provision, public action, and governance. The Liaison Group is a collaborative network of 10 public policy awards programs from around the globe.

  • 2010 Dec 01

    The Cracked Bell: America and the Afflictions of Liberty

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    124 Mount Auburn, Suite 200-North, Room 226, Cambridge, MA

    Tristram Riley-SmithTristram Riley-Smith

    About the Seminar
    In The Cracked Bell, an ethnographic study of contemporary United States, Riley-Smith identifies a distinctive and intriguing American paradox. Despite a powerful national myth – or narrative – of individualism, entrepreneurialism, and innovation, the anthropologist finds features of traditional patron-client societies associated with Southern Europe. An established network of power-blocs and semi-secret societies exist at many different levels of society, ranging from street gangs of Los Angeles, college fraternities, and trade unions, as well as networks of corporations, lobbyists, and politicians.... Read more about The Cracked Bell: America and the Afflictions of Liberty

  • 2010 Nov 18

    Breaking through Bureaucracy for Speedy Recovery: Lessons Learned from Post-Tsunami Indonesia

    5:00pm to 6:30pm

    Location: 

    Taubman 301, Taubman Building, HKS Campus

    About the Seminar
    The December 26, 2004 tsunami that devastated coastal areas along the Indian Ocean caused particularly extensive damage in north Sumatra, where destructive waves traveled more than five kilometers inland and tragically killed well over 100,000 area residents.

    In this session of the Program on Crisis Leadership’s (PCL) “Disaster Management in Asia” seminar series, Maggy Horhoruw, formerly with the Director’s Office of the Indonesian Rehabilitation and Reconstruction Agency (BRR), will highlight lessons learned from the massive recovery effort that followed, which not only involved scores of Indonesian governmental agencies but hundreds of international donors and aid organizations as well.... Read more about Breaking through Bureaucracy for Speedy Recovery: Lessons Learned from Post-Tsunami Indonesia

  • 2010 Nov 17

    Immigration and Democracy, from Know-Nothings to Koran Burning

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    124 Mount Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Room 226, Cambridge, MA

    Jack GoldstoneJack A. Goldstone, George Mason University

    About the Seminar
    Immigration injects new populations into the complex alignments of potential voters. Immigrants can be a target for populist demagogues, who seek to increase their political power by emphasizing the threat of newcomers as supposed enemies of the domestic way of life. Yet immigrants can also become pivotal voting blocs, particularly as they often cluster in major urban areas, or settle in key ’swing’ states where the existing balance among parties is very close. Thus even in established democracies, modest numbers of immigrants can ignite large shifts in political alignments and policies. Immigration policy itself then becomes highly politicized.

    These challenges will be particularly acute in the U.S. and Europe in coming decades, as labor force growth slows and immigration from abroad will likely increase. The problem is not simply one of ’integrating’ or ’assimilating’ immigrants, but of adjusting to their effect on political alignments and outcomes – a challenge that leaders often do not anticipate.... Read more about Immigration and Democracy, from Know-Nothings to Koran Burning

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