2012

  • 2012 Mar 21

    An Inside Job: Indonesia’s Path to Constitutional Democracy

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge, MA

    Donald HorowitzDonald Horowitz, Duke University

    About the Seminar
    After the fall of Suharto in 1998, Indonesia pursued an unusual course of democratization. It was insider-dominated and gradualist, and it involved free elections before a lengthy process of constitutional reform. At the end of the process, Indonesia’s amended constitution was essentially a radically new and thoroughly democratic document. By proceeding as they did, the Indonesians averted the great conflict that would have arisen between adherents of the old constitution and proponents of radical, immediate reform. Gradual reform also made possible the adoption of institutions that preserved pluralism, mitigated conflict, and pushed politics toward the center. The resulting democracy also has a number of prominent flaws, largely attributable to the process chosen, but it is a better outcome than the most likely alternatives.... Read more about An Inside Job: Indonesia’s Path to Constitutional Democracy

  • 2012 Mar 21

    Coping Strategies of Indonesian Humanitarian Volunteers: Personal, Organizational, Cultural, and Policy Dimensions

    12:00pm to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 100, Room 106, Cambridge, MA

    Maria Nelden Djakababa, HKS Indonesia Research Fellow

    About the Seminar
    In this brownbag presentation, HKS Indonesia Research Fellow Nelden Djakababa will discuss her research on post-traumatic growth and psychological well being of disaster response volunteers, focusing specifically on Indonesian Red Cross personnel who responded to the major earthquake that hit Yogyakarta and Central Java in 2007. Special attention will be given to the narrative-based analysis of the coping strategies employed by the volunteers, taking into account the Javanese culture-based approach to adversity. Her study also aims to identify critical points in how this coping process can be supported by the humanitarian organizations and disaster management policies.... Read more about Coping Strategies of Indonesian Humanitarian Volunteers: Personal, Organizational, Cultural, and Policy Dimensions

  • 2012 Mar 21

    Organizing in China: Communist Party of China, NGOs, and Beyond

    11:30am to 1:00pm

    Location: 

    Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building

    Elizabeth J. Perry, Harvard; Marshall Ganz, HKS; Anthony Saich, HKS
    Co-sponsored by the Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations

    About the Seminar
    Professor Elizabeth Perry will start with a discussion of how the early leaders of the CPC practiced organizing as described in her forthcoming book, Anyuan: Mining China’s Revolutionary Tradition

    Professor Marshall Ganz will then comment on this story from his framework of organizing and will share his perspective on organizing in China with reference to his experience in coaching organizing to 64 NGO leaders in Beijing last December. Ash Center Director and Professor Anthony Saich will comment on the application of Ganz’s framework in the Chinese context by referring to Perry’s research and other scenarios. Saich will conclude the event by facilitating a discussion among the speakers and the audience.

  • 2012 Mar 08

    If the Banks are Doing So Well, Why Can’t I Get a Loan?

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge, MA

    Jay RosengardRegulatory Constraints to Financial Inclusion in Indonesia
    Jay Rosengard, Harvard Kennedy School

    About the Seminar
    This seminar will explore two paradoxes of Indonesia’s financial sector: 1) Indonesia has been a global leader in microfinance for the past 25 years, but access to microfinance services is declining; and 2) Indonesia’s commercial banks are liquid, solvent, and profitable, and the Indonesian economy has been doing well over the past decade, but small and medium enterprises are facing a credit crunch. Thus, although Indonesia is underbanked, most commercial banks have been unresponsive to unmet effective demand. These paradoxes are especially challenging given that the behavior of banks has been in their own short-term best interests, primarily because of the unintended consequences of Indonesia’s financial sector reregulation after the East Asian crisis and contradictory monetary policies, which have produced a prudentially sound but inefficient, narrow, and homogenized banking oligopoly. The seminar will also review possible policy responses to increasing financial exclusion in Indonesia.... Read more about If the Banks are Doing So Well, Why Can’t I Get a Loan?

  • 2012 Mar 07

    Mixing Confucianism and Democracy

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge, MA

    Joseph ChanJoseph Chan, University of Hong Kong

    About the Seminar
    Many people think that Confucian political thought is incompatible with democracy. Professor Joseph Chan argues that this is an overstatement and that there are affinities and tensions between Confucian political values and democratic institutions. According to Chan, the best way to address the complex relationship of these two items is not by rejecting one and accepting the other, but rather by mixing them in ways that strengthen both. In this presentation, Chan will show how in ideal situations democratic elections can be seen as the best institutional means to express the Confucian political ideal. He will also explore ways in which Confucian values and virtues can enhance the quality of democratic governance and participation in non-ideal situations.... Read more about Mixing Confucianism and Democracy

  • 2012 Mar 05

    Healthy San Francisco: Providing Healthcare to San Francisco's Uninsured

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Tangerine M. Brigham, Director of Healthy San Francisco

    About the Seminar
    Healthy San Francisco targets underserved and disadvantaged populations. As an initiative of the city and county of San Francisco, it provides healthcare to the region’s estimated 64,000 uninsured adult residents.

     
    Healthy San Francisco presents before the National Selection Committee in November 2011

    Administered by the San Francisco Department of Public Health, Healthy San Francisco integrates existing public and private healthcare providers into a single, centralized system, whereby residents can enroll, select a primary care medical home, and gain access to services, information, and support. Since its launch in 2007, over 85 percent of uninsured have voluntarily enrolled in Healthy San Francisco, particularly notable as 20 percent of enrollees had not accessed healthcare services at all in the last two years. Independent evaluation data reveals that enrollees show steadily declining emergency department use over time and 94 percent of enrollees have expressed satisfaction with the program. At this seminar, Healthy San Francisco, one of the year's Innovations in American Government Award Finalist, will present its innovation.... Read more about Healthy San Francisco: Providing Healthcare to San Francisco's Uninsured

  • 2012 Feb 29

    The Return of the West: The U.S., EU, and China

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge, MA

    Richard RosecranceRichard Rosecrance, Harvard Kennedy School
    Co-sponsored by the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

    About the Seminar
    The United States is a democracy in (relative) decline. But it need not make war to reverse its fortunes or become subject to the attacks of other nations. Economic forces, as outlined in this seminar and Rosecrance’s forthcoming book, The Return of the West: The United States, the European Union and China, will likely mute challenges and also raise the overall power and influence of Western nations.... Read more about The Return of the West: The U.S., EU, and China

  • 2012 Feb 28

    Meeting the Challenge

    11:00am to 12:00pm

    Location: 

    Online Webinar

    Working with Large Federal Agencies to Achieve Large Landscape Conservation Goals
    Moderated by Jim Levitt, Director of the Program on Conservation Innovation at the Harvard Forest, Harvard University

    About the Web Session
    This online session will focus on opportunities to work alongside the U.S. Federal Government to advance large landscape conservation initiatives. The first opportunity we will consider is with the Department of Defense, which has recently issued the REPI Challenge to encourage projects that conserve land at a greater scale and test promising ways to finance land protection that will help the REPI program meet its ambitious goals with limited funding. As Nancy Natoli of the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Installations and Environment) will discuss, the Department may provide up to $5 million in additional FY12 funding for land transactions in the states of Georgia (Forts Benning, Stewart, and Gordon only) and Florida (Eglin Air Force Base and Camp Blanding only). The second case we will examine is focused on a recent conservation success on Maine’s Schoodic Point, where Lyme Timber Company - working in concert with several nonprofits – was able to protect a key, and relatively large, parcel of land adjacent to Acadia National Park’s Schoodic Peninsula District. Peter Stein of Lyme Timber will be on hand to give us insight into the deal that came to pass after many years of complex and patient negotiation.... Read more about Meeting the Challenge

  • 2012 Feb 27

    How Disruptive Innovation Can Help Government Achieve More for Less

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge, MA

    William EggersWilliam Eggers, Global Director for Deloitte Research

    About the Seminar
    In the wake of the deep austerity facing most governments around the world, leaders are faced with the challenge to “do more with less.” Unfortunately, typical cost reduction exercises inevitably result in a difficult trade-off – between price or performance. Breaking this seemingly unavoidable trade-off will require leaders to look at the public sector in a whole new way. The key to radically reducing costs, while maintaining or even improving services, is disruptive innovation. Creating the conditions for disruption will require policymakers to view government through a different lens. This seminar will provide examples of opportunities to implement disruptive innovation and offers a framework to introduce it in the public sector – proposing an alternative path to significantly reduce costs without sacrificing the quality of services.... Read more about How Disruptive Innovation Can Help Government Achieve More for Less

  • 2012 Feb 27

    Targeting the Poor: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia

    4:10pm to 5:30pm

    Location: 

    79 John F. Kennedy St., Taubman Building, 5th Floor, Room Nye A

    Rema HannaRema Hanna, Harvard Kennedy School
    Moderator: Elizabeth Osborn, Program Director of Harvard Kennedy School Indonesia Program

    About the Seminar
    Rema Hanna will discuss her recent research Targeting the Poor: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia, co-authored with Vivi Alatas, Abhijit Banerjee, Julia Tobias, and Ben Olken. This research systematically tests the effectiveness of targeting strategy for anti-poverty cash transfer program in Indonesia, namely, proxy-means test, using data on assets to predicts income; community targeting, using villagers own rank; and hybrid method. In particular, it examines the ability of each approach in identifying the poor and providing of satisfaction with transfer recipient list. Not only evaluating if the elite capture reduces community informational advantage, the research also observes if community has widely shared objective function beyond per-capita income. Understanding cost and benefit of targeting strategy is of practical importance for public policy makers, poverty-alleviation specialist, and for anyone interested in anti-poverty measures, especially in developing countries with, typically, substantial informal sector and lack of reliable earning records.... Read more about Targeting the Poor: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia

Pages