Comparative Democracy Series

The Ash Center’s Comparative Democracy Seminar Series, run by Candelaria Garay, Associate Professor of Public Policy, and Quinton Mayne, Associate Professor of Public Policy, brings innovative scholars in the field of comparative democracy to the Kennedy School to present their research.  Seminars have focused on topics as diverse as compulsory voting, the influence of Christian churches on public policy, the crisis of representation in Latin America, and the oil curse in the Middle East.  

2018 Apr 26

Analyzing and Addressing Intermittent Public Services: Insights from Bangalore's Water Sector

4:15pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

Ash Center Foyer, 124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200 North

This is a past event. We encourage you to view the photos below and sign up for our newsletter to be notified about similar events in the future. 

Join Alison Post, Associate Professor of Political Science and Global Metropolitan Studies, and Co-Director...

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2017 Oct 19

Regimes of Inequality: Politics and Health in Europe

4:15pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

Ash Center Foyer, 124 Mt. Auburn St., Suite 200-North, Cambridge MA 02138

The Ash Center invites you to join Julia Lynch, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania for a conversation about the politics of health inequalities in Europe. Quinton Mayne, Associate Professor of Public Policy at HKS, will moderate. This event is part of the Ash Center's Comparative Democracy Seminar Series.... Read more about Regimes of Inequality: Politics and Health in Europe

2017 Apr 20

Comparative Democracy Seminar: Communism's Shadow: Historical Legacies and Contemporary Political Attitudes

4:15pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Suite 200N, 124 Mt Auburn Street, Cambridge

About the SpeakerTucker

Joshua A. Tucker is Professor of Politics and affiliated Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies and Data Science at New York University, the Director of the NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia, a co-Director of the NYU Social Media and Political Participation (SMaPP) laboratory, and a co-author of the award winning Monkey Cage blog at The Washington Post. He serves on the Editorial Board of multiple academic journals as well the Advisory Board of the American National Election Study and was a founding co-editor of the Journal of Experimental Political Science. Professor Tucker specializes in the study of mass political behavior, including elections and voting, the development of partisan attachment, public opinion formation, mass protest, and the relationship between social media and political participation. He is the author of Regional Economic Voting: Russia, Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic, 1990-99 (Cambridge University Press, 2006) and the co-author of the forthcoming Communism’s Shadow: Historical Legacies and Contemporary Political Attitudes (Princeton University Press, 2017).

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2017 Feb 23

Comparative Democracy Seminar: America’s Two Worlds of Welfare

4:15pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

Ash Center, 124 Mt. Auburn St., Suite 200-North

Join Margaret Weir, Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs at Brown University, as she discusses, "America's Two Worlds of Welfare." The event will be moderated by Candelaria Garay, Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government.

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2016 Apr 07

Building Support for Taxation in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from Mexico

4:10pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, 124 Mount Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge, MA

Please join us for the next presentation of the Ash Center's Comparative Democracy Seminar Series. Gustavo Flores-Macías is an Assistant Professor of Government and Director of the Latin American Studies Program at Cornell University.  His talk is entitled: "Building Support for Taxation in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from Mexico."

Background
In spite of the importance of taxation for political and economic development, we know relatively little about the conditions under which citizens might not exact a political cost on leaders...

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2016 Mar 03

The Path to Denmark: How Do Societies Develop Control of Corruption?

4:10pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, 124 Mount Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge, MA

The Ash Center cordially invites you to a discussion with Alina Mungiu-Pippidi, Professor of Democracy Studies at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin, Germany as part of its Comparative Democracy Seminar Series. 

The author of  The Quest for Good Governance (Cambridge University Press 2015)...

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2015 Nov 19

Resource Wealth as Rent Leverage: Rethinking the Oil-Stability Nexus

4:10pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

Ash Center, 124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge, Mass

The Ash Center cordially invites you to the next session of its Comparative Democracy Seminar Series. We will be joined by Benjamin Smith, Associate Professor of Political Science and Research Foundation Professor at the University of Florida.  Dr. Smith will present his research on the "resource curse" and present a new indicator for oil dependence—a concept he terms rent leverage.  It captures the share of individuals’ buying power that directly depends on fuel income (and that nearly everywhere is controlled by...

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2015 Nov 05

Why No Coups in India? Explaining India’s Post-Independence Success in Managing its Military

4:10pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

Ash Center, 124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge, Mass

At Independence, India and Pakistan, like many other colonial states, inherited militaries that were conservative, ethnically unrepresentative, and seemed to pose a threat to democracy. Steven Wilkinson, Chair of the Department of Political Science at Yale, explores the ways in which India has been able to successfully handle these tensions, while Pakistan has not.... Read more about Why No Coups in India? Explaining India’s Post-Independence Success in Managing its Military