Police Violence and Crime in Rio de Janeiro: Evaluating the Pacifying Police Units

Date: 

Thursday, May 7, 2015, 4:10pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

Ash Center, 124 Mount Auburn St., Suite 200-North, Cambridge, MA

About the Event:

Police brutality and violent crime have been major problems in Rio de Janeiro. Violence has affected mostly the poor, especially those living in favelas. Using a multi-method research design, we explore some of the institutional, contextual and individual factors that account for police use of lethal force and how police violence varies through time and across space. We also present an evaluation of the Pacifying Police Units (UPPs), a form of proximity policing introduced in over 40 favelas between 2008 and 2014. Using geo-coded data on lethal violence during that period, we employ a quasi-experimental method to evaluate the extent to which the UPPs have reduced police violence and violent crime in the city of Rio de Janeiro. 

About the Speaker:

Beatriz Magaloni is an Associate Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University. She also directs FSI’s Program on Poverty and Governance and its recently launched Stanford’s International Crime and Violence Lab. Magaloni’s research interest are development, authoritarian regimes, violence and poverty reduction. Her first book Voting for Autocracy won various awards by the American Political Science Association and her second book,  The Logic of Poverty Relief: Electoral Strategy and Social Policy in Mexico, is forthcoming in Cambridge University Press. Her current work focuses on criminal violence, human rights, and police violence and she is conducting various impact evaluations on violence reducing interventions in Brazil and Mexico. Her work has appeared in the American Journal of Political ScienceJournal of Conflict ResolutionComparative Political StudiesLatin American Research ReviewJournal of Theoretical Politics, and World Development.  

This event is part of the Comparative Democracy Seminar Series

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