2020

New at the Ash Center

New at the Ash Center

October 21, 2020

Introducing new Ash Center community members, initiatives, resources, commentary, and courses 

2020 Oct 27

Will This Election Pick the Next President: Election Break Down and What to Do About It

1:00pm to 2:00pm

Location: 

Virtual event, registration required

The upcoming US election is unlike any in recent memory. Many are afraid that this most basic process of Americans voting to select their next President may break down. In this discussion, we’ll explore what election break down could look like: a President refusing to concede, a state legislature disregarding the popular vote, a tie breaker by a Supreme Court some view as illegitimate, Congress deciding the election according to “contingent election” provisions, or something else altogether? We’ll also explore how a wide range of democracy organizations and civic networks are...

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2020 Oct 29

#BlackLivesMatter Across the Americas: Black Youth Organizers and the Struggle for Racial Justice

4:00pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

Virtual event, registration required
Join the second event in the What Justice Looks Like series for a conversation with activists from Black youth-led movements from the US and Latin America, leading the struggle against racial injustice, from police violence to structural racism and disparate effects of the COVID pandemic on racialized and low-income communities.

Speakers include:
  • Ana Belique, Reconocido Movement (Santo Domingo)
  • Daniela Rincón, Casa Cultural El Chontaduro (Cali)
  • Marcelle Decothé, Marielle Franco Institute/Favelas Na Luta/Rio de Janeiro Youth Forum (Rio de...
Read more about #BlackLivesMatter Across the Americas: Black Youth Organizers and the Struggle for Racial Justice
Finding Allies and Making Revolution

Finding Allies and Making Revolution

October 19, 2020

In 1976, foreigners were a rarity in much of China. Even rarer still were foreigners from non-socialist countries studying in Chinese universities, especially given the recent social and educational upheavals of the Cultural Revolution, which was winding down. As a British-born graduate student at the University of Nanjing, Tony Saich—director of the Ash Center and Daewoo Professor of International Affairs—wasn’t exactly an inconspicuous presence around campus.

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