American Politics Speaker Series

The United States is a crossroads. How can Americans connect to each other in deep and meaningful ways, despite holding drastically different political world views? What are the causes and consequences of our nation's historic levels of partisan polarization? Just how far can democratic backsliding go?
 
The American Politics Speaker Series (APSS) aims to bring together scholars who are doing research on these and other important questions. Hosted jointly with the Center for American Political Studies and chaired by Professors Maya Sen, Benjamin Schneer, and Justin de Benedictis-Kessner, each session will highlight a scholar whose research is at the forefront of the study of American politics. 

Upcoming and Previous Events

2021 Dec 10

Deconstructing Race

12:00pm to 1:30pm

Location: 

Virtual event, registration required

Professor Hakeem Jefferson will discuss his forthcoming paper, "Deconstructing Race," which takes seriously the idea that race is socially constructed by endeavoring to deconstruct it. In particular, this work focuses on deconstructing the category “Black”—a racial category that has been uniquely and stringently defined throughout American history. Using an innovative conjoint experimental design, the authors surveyed a diverse sample of Americans to examine several sociopolitical antecedents of Blackness and ask: how flexible is the category “Black” in American society...

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2021 Nov 12

Truly at Home? Perceived Belonging and Latino Political Participation

12:00pm to 1:30pm

Location: 

Virtual event, registration required

How do perceptions of belonging or lack of belonging to American society influence political interest and political engagement? To date, there have been few inquiries that systematically investigate notions of perceived belonging to U.S. society and the political ramifications of these predispositions. This project addresses this puzzle and investigates how a sense of...

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2021 Oct 29

Enfranchisement and Incarceration after the 1965 Voting Rights Act

12:00pm to 1:30pm

Location: 

Virtual event, registration required

As part of the American Political Speakers Series, Professor Adriane Fresh of Duke University will present her recent scholarship examining how The 1965 Voting Rights Act (VRA) sought to fundamentally change the distribution of electoral power in the U.S. South. She will examine the consequences of this mass enfranchisement of Black people for the use of the carceral state---police, the courts, and the...

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2021 Oct 15

Andrew Reeves: The Origins and Consequences of Public Antipathy towards Presidential Power

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Virtual event

Americans have deep-seated skepticism about presidential power. This skepticism is not always made explicit in the public’s day-to-day political expressions, but it is a latent force in American political culture forged at the founding of the nation and ingrained in grade school civics lessons. It is not a legalistic or intellectual understanding of the text of the US Constitution or Declaration of Independence. Rather, this skepticism reflects a belief that the separation of powers, especially in their protection from tyranny, is...

Read more about Andrew Reeves: The Origins and Consequences of Public Antipathy towards Presidential Power