Video  

Electoral College Symposium: What’s to be Done?

On April 3rd, panelists discussed if there is, in fact, a better way to elect the President of the United States.

About the Speakers

Danielle Allen, James Bryant Conant University Professor, Harvard University; Director of the Allen Lab for Democracy Renovation, Harvard Kennedy School’s Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation

George Edwards, Distinguished Fellow, University of Oxford; University Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Jordan Chair in Presidential Studies Emeritus, Texas A&M UniversityAlex Keyssar, Matthew W. Stirling, Jr. Professor of History
and Social Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Moderated by Archon Fung, Innovation Winthrop Laflin McCormack Professor of Citizenship and Self-Government at Harvard Kennedy School; Director, Harvard Kennedy School’s Ash Center for Democratic Governance

More from this Program

What led to the rise — and then fall — of participatory democracy in Colombia?
A ballot box reads

Feature

What led to the rise — and then fall — of participatory democracy in Colombia?

Research by Democracy Postdoctoral Fellow Jamie Shenk highlights how referendums in Colombia served as a powerful tool to block the expansion of mining and oil enterprises before the practice was curbed by the country’s Supreme Court.

Avoiding conflict over conflicts of interest
A sign reads,

Feature

Avoiding conflict over conflicts of interest

Developing and enforcing conflict of interest policies is no simple task for anti-corruption advocates and ethics officials alike. Archon Fung and Dennis Thompson help to better understand the problem and examine when risk is underestimated and when it is overestimated.

Laws That Govern Jail-Based Voting: A 50-State Legal Review

Additional Resource

Laws That Govern Jail-Based Voting: A 50-State Legal Review

As part of the Ash Center’s ongoing work examining the legal, political, and policy implications of advancing jail-based voting, Aaron Rosewood and Tova Wang examine the statutory basis for jail voting in each state.

More on this Issue

Avoiding conflict over conflicts of interest
A sign reads,

Feature

Avoiding conflict over conflicts of interest

Developing and enforcing conflict of interest policies is no simple task for anti-corruption advocates and ethics officials alike. Archon Fung and Dennis Thompson help to better understand the problem and examine when risk is underestimated and when it is overestimated.

Laws That Govern Jail-Based Voting: A 50-State Legal Review

Additional Resource

Laws That Govern Jail-Based Voting: A 50-State Legal Review

As part of the Ash Center’s ongoing work examining the legal, political, and policy implications of advancing jail-based voting, Aaron Rosewood and Tova Wang examine the statutory basis for jail voting in each state.