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Avoiding conflict over conflicts of interest

Developing and enforcing conflict of interest policies is no simple task for anti-corruption advocates and ethics officials alike. Archon Fung and Dennis Thompson help to better understand the problem and examine when risk is underestimated and when it is overestimated.

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Fall 2021 Communiqué Magazine

Communique Magazine

Fall 2021 Communiqué Magazine

In this issue, as the Chinese Communist Party celebrates its 100th anniversary, Ash Center experts delve into the historial legacy of the party as well as what the future holds for the party and China. We share profiles of the scholars and students who make the Ash Center such a unique institution, and introduce new research and ideas from across our thirty programs, projects, and initiatives.

Book Talk — Nothing is Impossible: America’s Reconciliation with Vietnam

Video

Book Talk — Nothing is Impossible: America’s Reconciliation with Vietnam

The Ash Center invites you to a book talk with former U.S. ambassador to Vietnam, Ted Osius, author of the book “Nothing is Impossible: America’s Reconciliation with Vietnam.” Osius was joined in discussion by Thomas Vallely, Senior Advisor for Mainland Southeast Asia at the Ash Center.

Building Back Better: Intelligent Infrastructure and Civil Works

Video

Building Back Better: Intelligent Infrastructure and Civil Works

Join us for an Ash Center virtual discussion on how developing intelligent infrastructure is crucial for helping the United States tackle the challenge of inequitable, inaccessible, and inadequate roads, bridges, dams, sidewalks, and water systems throughout the country. In this talk co-author Betsy Gardner introduced the recent paper, “Toward a Smarter Future: Building Back Better with Intelligent Civil Infrastructure — Smart Sensors and Self-Monitoring Civil Works”, followed by co-author Jill Jamieson and subject matter expert Professor Luna Lu spoke about innovation in infrastructure. The conversation was moderated by co-author Professor Stephen Goldsmith.

Tune in us as Gardner, Jamieson, Lu, and Goldsmith made the argument for a strategic, smart infrastructure plan that integrates digital technology, sensors, and data to not only address existing issues but to mitigate risks and improve the conditions and structures that shape our daily lives.

Navigating the American Rescue Plan Act: A Series for Tribal Nations, Session 7

Video

Navigating the American Rescue Plan Act: A Series for Tribal Nations, Session 7

From setting tribal priorities to building infrastructure to managing and sustaining projects, the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) presents an unprecedented opportunity for the 574 federally recognized tribal nations to use their rights of sovereignty and self-government to strengthen their communities. As the tribes take on the challenges presented by the Act, the Ash Center’s Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development hosted a series designed to assist tribes, to help tribes learn from each other and from a wide array of guest experts.

During this session, the seventh in the series, following a round of discussion between the panelists, a brief Q+A session was held to maximize the opportunities for audience participation.

This session, titled “Direct Relief for Tribal Citizens: Getting beyond Per Caps” featured:

  • Rodney Butler, Chairman, Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation
  • Cathy Chavers, Chairwoman, Bois Forte Band of Chippewa
  • Miriam Jorgensen, HKS 1991 MPP 2000 PhD, Research Director, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona
  • Kevin Killer, President, Oglala Sioux Tribe
  • Karen Diver, Moderator, HKS 2003 MPA, Board of Governors, Honoring Nations, Harvard Project

Navigating the American Rescue Plan Act: A Series for Tribal Nations, Session 6

Video

Navigating the American Rescue Plan Act: A Series for Tribal Nations, Session 6

From setting tribal priorities, to building infrastructure, to managing and sustaining projects, the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) presents an unprecedented opportunity for the 574 federally recognized tribal nations to use their rights of sovereignty and self-government to strengthen their communities. As the tribes take on the challenges presented by the Act, the Ash Center’s Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development hosted a series designed to assist tribes, to help tribes learn from each other and from a wide array of guest experts. During this session, the sixth in the series, following a round of discussion between the panelists a brief Q+A session was held to maximize the opportunities for audience participation.

This session, titled “Investing in Your Tribes’ Infrastructure” featured:

  • Lael Echo-Hawk (Pawnee Nation), Principal, MThirtySix, PLLC
  • Wendy Helgemo (Ho-Chunk Nation), Senior Legislative Attorney, Big Fire Law & Policy Group LLP
  • Joe Valandra (Rosebud Sioux Tribe), Executive Director, Native American Contractors Association
  • Moderated by Karen Diver (Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa), HKS MPA 2003, Board of Governors, Honoring Nations, Harvard Project

Navigating the American Rescue Plan Act: A Series for Tribal Nations, Session 5

Video

Navigating the American Rescue Plan Act: A Series for Tribal Nations, Session 5

From setting tribal priorities, to building infrastructure, to managing and sustaining projects, the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) presents an unprecedented opportunity for the 574 federally recognized tribal nations to use their rights of sovereignty and self-government to strengthen their communities. As the tribes take on the challenges presented by the Act, the Ash Center’s Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development hosted a series designed to assist tribes, to help tribes learn from each other and from a wide array of guest experts. During this session, the fifth in the series, following a round of discussion between the panelists a brief Q+A session was held to maximize the opportunities for audience participation.

This session, titled “Investing In Your Tribes’ Behavioral Health” featured:

  • Stacy Bohlen (Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians), CEO, National Indian Health Board
  • Del Laverdure (Crow Nation), Attorney, Former Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs, Department of Interior
  • Lynn Malerba (Mohegan Tribe), Lifetime Chief, Mohegan Tribe
  • Moderated by Karen Diver (Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa), HKS MPA 2003, Board of Governors, Honoring Nations, Harvard Project

Navigating the American Rescue Plan Act: A Series for Tribal Nations, Session 4

Video

Navigating the American Rescue Plan Act: A Series for Tribal Nations, Session 4

From setting tribal priorities, to building infrastructure, to managing and sustaining projects, the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) presents an unprecedented opportunity for the 574 federally recognized tribal nations to use their rights of sovereignty and self-government to strengthen their communities. As the tribes take on the challenges presented by the Act, the Ash Center’s Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development hosted a series designed to assist tribes, to help tribes learn from each other and from a wide array of guest experts.

Where do you want to see your nation in 100 years? What decisions in the short and long term will help you achieve this vision? In this session, the fourth in the series, we looked at strategic decision making and the value of long-term planning, investing in human capital, data collection, and how incremental implementation can strengthen your tribe into the future. Each panelist presentation was followed by a brief Q+A session to maximize the opportunities for audience participation.

This session, titled “Strategic Planning and Implementation – How to Pick the Winners and Help Your Tribe” featured:

  • Cheryl Andrews-Maltais (Aquinnah), Chairwoman, Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head Aquinnah
  • Patricia Riggs (Tigua), Indigenous Consultant
  • Joan Timeche (Hopi), Executive Director, Native Nations Institute University of Arizona
  • Amy Besaw Medford (Brothertown Indian) Moderator, HGSE 2002, Ed.M., Research Affiliate, Harvard Project