Technology

Transforming Governance Through Technology

 

Introduction
Research
Students
Practitioners

Introduction

The story of technology and government is the story of innovation in government, and the Ash Center has long been the Kennedy School’s primary resource for the research, teaching, and practice of public sector innovation. Over time, the Center has focused its efforts on the potential and pitfalls of a number of levers available to public innovators—public value creation; privatization and managed competition, networked and collaborative governance, social innovation, and encouraging innovative jurisdictions. It has also long turned its attention to the potential and pitfalls of technology as a lever for improving democratic governance.

The Ash Center’s research on public sector innovation provides a solid foundation for HKS as it builds a rigorous field of study on the influence of technology on governance. We are deploying our well-established infrastructure for providing co-curricular opportunities toward helping students develop technology-related skills. Finally, the Ash Center’s robust practitioner networks, convening experience, and established distribution platforms allow real-time feedback and learning while showing the Kennedy School’s leadership in the field.

Research

CompStat
An early meeting of CompStat, which was recognized by the Ash Center's Innovations in American Government Awards Program.

The Innovations in Government Program has served as the nucleus for much of the School’s work on innovation and government for nearly 30 years. Since 1985, the Innovation in American Government Awards Program has been recognizing value-creating innovations across all areas of government. The Program has played a leading role in identifying the frontier of technology in governance for three decades, harking back to the early days of electronic public assistance benefit transfers in the 1980s to the emergence of CompStat in New York and the broader performance stat movement in the 1990s to the rise of 311 and its later electronic variants in the 2000s. 

Equally important, the Ash Center has been conducting and supporting research on the processes, structures, and strategies deployed by innovative public officials and managers—creating innovative, learning organizations; diffusing best practices; leading and facilitating multi-sector networks of providers and  stakeholders; and improving public participation, transparency, deliberation, mobilization, and more. This research has advanced our ability to teach degree program and executive education students how to become creative and effective public leaders prepared for the known and unknown challenges they will soon face.

Innovation Field Lab in Lawrence
The Ash Center's Innovation Field Lab is working with medium-sized cities in Massachusetts, such as Lawrence to strengthen data collection and analysis capabilities.

In 2012, Stephen Goldsmith launched The Data-Smart City Solutions project to catalyze adoption of data projects on the local government level by serving as a central resource for cities interested in this emerging field. The project has provided dozens of students with opportunities to contribute to research on the intersection of government and data. Data-Smart City Solutions seeks to promote the combination of integrated, cross-agency data with community data to better discover and preemptively address civic problems. The center has also launched the Innovation Field Lab as part of a major research in partnership with a number of small to medium sized cities in eastern Massachusetts to better understand the conditions that allow technological innovations in government to take root. 

The Transparency Policy Project, overseen by Archon Fung, helps governments understand when it is most useful to make data publicly available. Tarek Masoud's recent work on the Arab Spring movement has leveraged social media data to paint an accurate picture of public sentiment during the mass protests and provide a critical alternative to traditional public polling data. Tony Saich is working with post-docs to document tweets that were sent following the latest publication of the Five-Year Plan in China to gauge citizen reaction.

Students

Students and Technology
HKS student entrepreneurs demonstrate their startup projects at a technology showcase and roundtable event at the Ash Center.

At the heart of the Ash Center are the students it supports. Engaging nearly ten percent of HKS students though some form of support whether scholarships, research grants, internship placements, research assistantships, and more, the Center has helped nurture a strong cohort of students interested in the intersection of government and technology. They want to code. They are passionate about net neutrality.  They are perplexed by the failures of the launch of healthcare.gov.  They are budding technologists who have chosen public policy over dot com riches. We have aligned with a cadre of students who are passionate and engaged on issues related to civic technology and technology policy.

We will continue to support Tech4Change and other student groups bringing tech-related opportunities and speakers to HKS. We are also sponsoring in part the work of Nick Sinai, including co-sponsorship of his panel series on technology and governance. We are also organizing a series of six hands-on workshops on hard and soft-skills in technology, to be led by technologists and other practitioners who are part of our new Technology and Democracy Fellowship Program. The Innovation Field Lab has grown to a full-semester course and continues to connect students to the real-world process of implementing a data project in mid-sized cities. Our summer internships will continue to place students in mayors’ offices and other government agencies to work on technology-related projects.

Practitioners

The Ash Center convenes practitioners to actively engage and learn about the development and implementation of data-driven best practices to drive innovative change across jurisdictions and the world. Whether it is our Project on Municipal Innovation, our Project on County Innovation, or other programs, the Center connects public officials to the latest research and proven government programs that use new technologies to enhance public value.  The Center has built important relationships with the technologists around the world to promote innovative solutions to issues of democratic engagement and public participation.  The Center’s work in this area can be seen through its support of hackathons and technology demonstration events including #Hack4Congress and #Tech4Democracy

The Ash Center has several efforts that disseminate data-driven solutions to public problems. The Data-Smart City Solutions project is working to catalyze adoption of data projects on the local government level by serving as a central resource for cities interested in this emerging field. Our Better, Faster, Cheaper blog captures the latest in cutting-edge technology, innovative policy approaches, and creative partnerships between government and the private sector. The Government Innovators Network is the largest online academic portal to provide up-to-date examples of government innovation - many technology-specific - for policymakers, policy advisers, and practitioners interested in improving government and governance.